First of all, consider her quotes. She would rather look chubby on screen, but like a person in real life? This is a message of positivity only for people who consider themselves chubby, and it comes at the expense of women who are thin. Maybe they’re thin because they’re sick. Maybe they’re naturally slender. But when someone says they would rather “look like a person” than look thin, the message between the lines is that thin people don’t look like people.
clitosaurousrex

clitosaurousrex

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I think I’d rather date her…

I think I’d rather date her…

Beautiful… I’m surprised

Beautiful… I’m surprised

One relationship that meant a lot to fans was the one I had with Demi Lovato, who I’ve known for years. We had been friends forever, we were both Disney kids, and because we played a couple in the Camp Rock Disney Channel specials—and fans liked seeing us together—we eventually dated for a month. I really got to know her and got to see the ins and outs of what she was struggling with, like drug abuse. I felt like I needed to take care of her, but at the same time I was living a lie, because I wasn’t happy but felt like I had to stay in it for her, because she needed help. I couldn’t express any of that, of course, because I had a brand to protect.
Feminist theory tells us that research and application must be intentional and considerate of the lived experience of those involved. It is important to understand that the environmental justice movement has intersections just like any other movement. For example, environmental injustices happen to the differently abled, women, indigenous communities, low-income communities, and in communities of color. In most cities, power plants and oil refineries are in the lower-income side of town. In turn, working class families experience the backlash of poor regulation, including polluted water and air. We then must look at health care equality and accessibility. In most cases, Native American reservations deal with problems associated with toxic water and water including asthma and bronchitis.
Intersectionality (or Intersectionalism) is the study of intersections between different disenfranchised groups or groups of minorities; specifically, the study of the interactions of multiple systems of oppression or discrimination.[1] This feminist sociological theory was first highlighted by Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989. Intersectionality is a methodology of studying “the relationships among multiple dimensions and modalities of social relationships and subject formations” (McCall 2005). The theory suggests that—and seeks to examine how—various biological, social and cultural categories such as gender, race, class, ability, sexual orientation, species, and other axes of identity interact on multiple and often simultaneous levels, contributing to systematic injustice and social inequality. Intersectionality holds that the classical conceptualizations of oppression within society, such as racism, sexism, homophobia, and belief-based bigotry including nationalism, do not act independently of one another; instead, these forms of oppression interrelate, creating a system of oppression that reflects the “intersection” of multiple forms of discrimination.[2]
Men are privileged in the world in a way that women have never been. It is unearned - you didn’t do anything for it, you didn’t earn it, you just have it. Just because you’re a man, you have it. You were born with it, but unlike a disease or illness that doctors can spot right away, privilege is invisible. Probably no one would have told you about it or talked to you about it. You may have gone your entire life up until this moment without having ever heard about it. And yet it has been as much a part of your life as breathing, unseen but at the same time, entirely present.
Lily

Lily